Resources for Educators

Supporting Students at Times of Crisis and Loss

This presentation by David J. Schonfeld of the USC School of Social Work and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, provides guidance on working with students who are grieving or experiencing ongoing trauma.

The Teacher’s Guide for Supporting Students from Military Families

This book is an evidence-informed guide introducing pre- and in-service teachers to this population and providing essential tools to help minimize the impact of military life on student learning. It provides strategies and classroom practices to support these students and address issues such as frequent transitions between schools, gaps in academic progress, and social adjustment.

It shows how practices already being used in your school can be adapted to ease the transition for military students, and it also introduces original strategies, such as “A Hero Wall” honoring members of the military, friendship or memory gardens and military appreciation events.

View ordering information for the Teacher’s Guide.

The School Administrator’s Guide for Supporting Students from Military Families

This book is an evidence-informed guide that introduces school administrators to this population and offers tools to help them implement school-wide programs that will support military students’ learning.

This practical guide includes profiles of principals who have created welcoming school environments for military children and parents, lessons learned from the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) schools and a chapter on using data to improve school culture for military students.

View ordering information for the School Administrator’s guide.

The Pupil Personnel Guide for Supporting Students from Military Families

This book introduces counselors, psychologists, and social workers to this population and provides the necessary tools to create one-on-one and school-wide practices to support military students.

The guide includes a primer on military culture and research highlighting how frequent school transitions and parental deployments affect the education of military children. It also includes examples of creative and effective projects designed to honor military children and support them through frequent school changes, a parent’s deployment, or traumatic experiences.

View ordering information for the Pupil Personnel guide.

The Promotional Role of School and Community Contexts for Military Students

This article examines how supportive public school environments can serve as a promotional context for the development of children and adolescents from military families. Authors integrate theory and research from multiple research strands to outline how public schools can support the development of all children. Provide further support for the supposition that school climates and the social-ecological contexts surrounding a school (e.g., universities, communities, school districts) can protect at-risk children and adolescents from an array of negative social, emotional, and psychological outcomes. Authors draw linkages between these research domains and the development of military children and adolescents and argue that promotional civilian school environments embedded within supportive and inclusive contexts can create a social infrastructure that supports the development of military children and adolescents, creating a foundation for interventions and research that focuses on schools as normative, supportive, and developmental settings for military children and youth. Article concludes with a discussion of future directions in research on the development of military children and adolescents.

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A Call to Duty: Educational Policy and School Reform Addressing the Needs of Children From Military Families

More than 90% of the nation’s 1.2 million military children attend civilian-operated public schools. Education researchers, however, often overlook the educational experiences and needs of military children attending civilian-operated public schools (i.e., schools that are administered by and under the purview of local education agencies). This article is the first in an educational research journal to examine the intersections among state policy, school reform, and the educational experiences of military children. This article also highlights new data sources and funding opportunities for research on military students.

Read the complete article.